The Death Cure

Please note that this review may contain spoilers for earlier instalments of this series. You can read my reviews of these novels [here] and [here].

The Death Cure was written by James Dashner and first published in 2011. It forms the final part of The Maze Runner Trilogy and is preceded by The Maze Runner (2009) and The Scorch Trials (2010). Dashner has also released two prequel novels set in the same universe: The Kill Order (2012) and The Fever Code (2016). As The Death Cure carries on precisely where The Scorch Trials left off, I would strongly advise reading these books in sequence to fully appreciate them.

WICKED promised a cure, yet Thomas has been betrayed again. Abandoned in solitary confinement, he is left to fear that he will succumb to the Flare. When the Rat Man finally comes for him, it is with an unexpected proposition. The scientist claims that WICKED is very close to discovering the cure, but for the final round of tests they will need to restore the memories of all of the survivors.

As Thomas is reunited with the surviving Gladers, he realises that he can’t stand to be used again. With the help of Minho, Newt, Brenda and Jorge, he escapes the facility and flees to the safe haven of Denver. It is there that they discover the Right Arm – a small band of rebels who share their hatred of WICKED. Finally, Thomas realises that they have a chance at toppling their enemies and ensuring that the trials are stopped forever.

However, it will not be easy. The Flare is spreading fast and not all of Thomas’s friends are immune. It’s not long before the Rat Man seeks Thomas out and reveals that he has been selected as the Final Candidate. If he complies with WICKED, the rest of the world could be saved from the terrible disease. Thomas needs to make a choice, and quickly. He could well be the key to saving the world, but is the Right Arm all that it seems and can WICKED be trusted?

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The Scorch Trials

The Scorch Trials

Please note that this review may contain spoilers for its prequel, The Maze Runner. You can read my review of this novel [here].

To celebrate the release of the movie, I’ve decided to bump forward my review of The Scorch Trials by James Dashner. The novel was first published in 2010 and is the second book in The Maze Runner trilogy. It is preceded by The Maze Runner (2009) and followed by The Death Cure (2011). Dashner has also released a prequel novel titled The Kill Order (2012). A second prequel, reportedly titled The Fever Code, has been cited for release in 2016.

Following their traumatic escape from the Maze, Thomas and the other Gladers finally seem to be safe. However, when they wake up in the night to find that all of their saviours are dead, they realise that their ordeal is far from over. Searching the complex, Thomas finds that Teresa has been taken from them. In her place, they find another boy – Aris – who tells them that he was previously trapped in a different Maze. The only difference between their situations was that his group was otherwise entirely female and his partner – Thomas’s equivalent – was killed during their escape.

It is not long before WICKED contacts them again and reveals that a further Trial awaits. This time, each of them has been infected with the Flare. If they wish to survive, all they need to do is travel north for 100 miles. If they reach the Safe Haven their within two weeks, they will all be cured and their trials will finally be over. If they fail, they will succumb to the disease and die.

While the task seems straightforward, the Gladers quickly discover that this is not the case. The world above is a barren wasteland, plagued by the scorching sun, deadly lightning storms and bands of people who have been driven mad by the Flare. Yet these obstacles may be the least of their problems. They are also competing against Group B, who Thomas quickly discovers are determined to kill him…

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The Maze Runner

The Maze Runner

In case you missed my post yesterday, I’m taking a brief break from my schedule to bring you a short series of “Christmas” reviews. You can read more about it [here].

The Maze Runner was written by James Dashner and first published in 2009. It is a dystopian novel which focuses on a teenager named Thomas as he tries to find a way to escape a deadly maze. The book was followed by two sequels – The Scorch Trials (2010) and The Death Cure (2011) – and a prequel titled The Kill Order (2012). Another prequel (reported to be titled The Fever Code) is due for release in 2016.

When Thomas awakes to find himself trapped in a moving lift, he realises that he can remember little other than his own name. When the lift finally opens, he finds himself in a large grassy area which is populated entirely by boys aged between 12 and 17. The place – known as the Glade – stands at the centre of an endless maze which changes every day. The boys have made it their mission to solve the maze in order to find a way to escape.

The Gladers have formed an efficient society, with those unable to run the maze taking on jobs to ensure that everyone survives while the mysterious people below keep them stocked up with daily supplies and a new boy every month. However, things change the day after Thomas’s arrival when the lift moves again and this time brings up the first girl. She carries with her a note that declares that she will be the last.

Soon after, things suddenly start to become more dangerous. The sun disappears from the sky and the supply packs stop coming. Worse of all, the doors into the maze no longer close at night, leaving all of the boys vulnerable attacks from the horrible monsters (known as Grievers) that live there. Thomas knows that they urgently need to solve the maze and escape and feels that he is the one to do it. There is something familiar about his whole situation and he knows that its secret lies in his missing memories…

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