Owlcrate Unboxing – April 2020

Hello everyone! Hope you’re all doing okay in isolation at the moment. Apologies that this unboxing is so late this month. Due to the current situation, Owlcrate has understandably had some delays in sending out their boxes. Yet, my April crate has finally arrived, which is the main thing!

For those of you who haven’t read any of my previous unboxings, here is what you need to know. Owlcrate is a monthly subscription service for fans of Young Adult novels. Each box costs around £38 to ship to the United Kingdom and is guaranteed to contain one newly released book, usually signed by the author and with an exclusive cover. In addition to this, the boxes contain 3-5 other items that are carefully curated to follow the monthly theme. This month, the theme was “Full Moon Magic”.

Oh, and a final word of warning. As Owlcrate is a subscription service, it guarantees you each box as long as your subscription remains active. While you can cancel at any time, you should bear in mind that the boxes often sell out very quickly and so it can be difficult to get back onto the mailing list once you come off (I made this mistake myself last September…).

Anyhow, I think that covers everything. Let’s take a look at what was inside the April crate. Please bear in mind that this post does contain pictures and massive spoilers for those of you who are still waiting for your crate to arrive…

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Point Horror 6-10

Please note that this review may contain spoilers for earlier instalments of this series. You can read my review of these novels [here].

I was not expecting to post another retrospective so soon, yet I’m bored of lockdown and certainly getting a lot of reading done!

Let’s take another look at Point Horror – a young adult anthology series that was published between 1991 and 2014. Please note that I’ve selected the reviewing order of these books based on a list that I pulled off Wikipedia, as there seems to be some debate regarding the publication order of these novels. This review is also intended to be more of a retrospective, and therefore contains massive spoilers for the novels in question.

In My Secret Admirer (written by Carol Ellis), Jenny has only just moved to town and her parents have already left her home alone. Luckily, some of the locals invite her to take part in a scavenger hunt in the mountain foothills. Jenny is nervous, but things go from bad to worse when Diana Benson has a terrible accident and falls off a cliff. The next day, Jenny starts to get calls and gifts from a secret admirer. Is someone really interested in her, or does some one think that she knows something about the accident. Someone who wants to be sure that Jenny keeps her mouth shut…

In April Fools (written by Ritchie Tankersley Cusick), Belinda is driving home from a party when she is involved in a terrible accident. The other car swerves off a cliff, but Belinda’s friends force her to leave it and run away. Two weeks later, the pranks start. Someone seems to know that Belinda was involved and is intent on making her suffer. Yet things get worse still when Belinda is asked to mentor a sick teenager named Adam. Especially when she learns that Adam was injured in a car accident two weeks prior…

In Final Exam (written by A Bates), Kelly’s biggest fear is of exams. No matter how hard she studies, she always freezes under pressure. Finals week gets off to a strange start when she discovers another student’s journal – one filled with intense self-help messages about being a “winner”. With other things on her mind, Kelly pockets the journal and goes on with her business. Yet it’s not long before things get strange. What start out as harmless pranks against Kelly grow more sinister, almost as though someone does not want her to graduate. What secrets could possibly hidden within the journal, and why would someone be prepared to kill to get it back?

In Funhouse (written by Diane Hoh), the Santa Luisa Boardwalk is a popular meeting place for teenagers. That is, until the day that the Devil’s Elbow roller coaster flies off the rails, leaving one dead and two seriously injured. Although everyone thinks that it was a tragic accident, Tess is sure that she saw a dark figure hanging around beneath the tracks just before the incident occurred. Now, it seems that someone is targeting her. Someone wants Tess silenced, and will hurt anyone who gets in their way.

In Beach Party (written by R.L. Stine), Karen’s father has let her stay alone in his beach-front apartment for the whole summer. What better chance for her and her best friend Ann-Marie to soak up the sun and party the night away? It’s not long before Karen meets two cute guys – handsome Jerry and bad-boy Vince – and struggles to pick who she likes best. But then the messages start. Someone is desperate to keep Karen away from Jerry at all costs. Although Karen dismisses this as being from a jealous ex-girlfriend at first, she soon starts to have her doubts when it becomes clear that the stranger is prepared to kill if she doesn’t obey…

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Point Horror 1-5

It’s time to begin a new series of my retrospective reviews. Hooray! As I’ve now read through every single Animorphs and classic Goosebumps book, I think it’s time to now turn my attention to some classic horror stories for older teens. That’s right, it’s time to revisit Point Horror.

In case you’re unfamiliar, Point Horror is a anthology series that was published by Scholastic between 1991 and 2014. Early instalments were just re-prints of earlier Scholastic titles, but the series achieved massive popularity in the mid-nineties and was a staple favourite of every teen. The stories are somewhat darker than Goosebumps books, often focusing on older teens as they are targeted by stalkers and psychopaths. Please note that, as per all of my other retrospectives, this post will contain massive spoilers for the novels in question.

In Twisted (written by R.L. Stine), Abby is determined to become a Tri Gam as it is the most exclusive sorority on campus and the only accepts a chosen few each year. The thing that she was not prepared for was the hazing. To become a Tri Gam, the pledges need to commit a crime. However, when something goes horribly wrong and someone winds up dead, Abby and the new pledges are forced to band together to hide their shared secret…

In The Lifeguard (written by Ritchie Tankersley Cusick), Kelsey’s summer holiday on Beverly Island begins in disaster. She was supposed to be staying with her mum’s new boyfriend but his teenage daughter, Beth, has vanished. As Kelsey explores the island, she soon learns that Beth is not the first. A number of young women have mysteriously drowned off the coast of the Island. It’s almost like the local lifeguards aren’t doing a very good job…

In Party Line (written by A Bates), Mark is addicted to calling the Party Line as he finds it so much easier to talk anonymously to girls. It’s not long before he begins to recognise different voices, especially the sleazy and desperate “Ben”. However, when a girl goes missing shortly after agreeing to meet with Ben, Mark starts to realise that perhaps Party Line isn’t as harmless as it seems. But will he be able to track down Ben in real life without becoming one of his victims?

In The Baby-Sitter (written by R.L. Stine), Jenny is thrilled to be offered a regular baby-sitting gig after a chance meeting at the mall. However, when she first visits the Hagen house, she starts to have her doubts. It is really run-down and their neighbour is more than a little sinister, and there have also been those attacks on baby-sitters in the area. Then, the threatening phone calls start, promising her that “Company’s Coming”. Will Jenny manage to keep her wits about her and survive the night, or will she become another victim…

In Trick or Treat (written by Ritchie Tankersley Cusick), Martha isn’t happy to leave Chicago and move to the sticks to live with her new stepmother and her teenage son, Connor. However, she feels worse still when she sees the old, spooky house where they live. Then the practical jokes start, growing more dangerous and malicious by the day. She soon learns that something terrible once happened in the house, and she could very well be next!

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Owlcrate Unboxing – March 2020

Hello everyone! I hope that you are all keeping well. It’s been a pretty crazy month but it’s time for another Owlcrate unboxing!

In case this is the first of my unboxings that you have had the pleasure of reading, let’s talk a little about what they are for. Owlcrate is a monthly mystery box for fans of Young Adult novels. Each box costs around £38 to ship the the United Kingdom and is guaranteed to contain 3-5 collectables, all selected around a different monthly theme. On top of this, the box is contains a newly released hardback, usually signed and with an exclusive cover.

Owlcrates tend to sell out incredibly quickly, though you are guaranteed to receive each box as long as you have an active subscription. This subscription can be cancelled at any time, though I would recommend only doing so if you are sure. I made the mistake of cancelling last year and it took me a couple of months to get it back again!

As you might be able to tell from the striking blue box, this month’s box was a bit of a special one as it’s Owlcrate’s 5th Anniversary! The theme this time around was ‘Music of the Night’ and scroll on to see what exciting things were contained with in.

Be warned – massive spoilers lie below for anyone who has not yet received their crate…

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Owlcrate Unboxing – February 2020

Hi everyone! It’s time for another look at Owlcrate! As I mentioned in last month’s unboxing, Owlcrate is a monthly subscription service for fans of Young Adult books. With shipping to the UK, each box comes to around £38 and comes packed with goodies. They are guaranteed to include a hard-backed recent release, usually signed by the author and with an exclusive cover. There are also 3-5 additional items, all of which are tied to a monthly theme.

Owlcrates sell out incredibly quickly, though they do have a waiting list and they guarantee that you will receive each box so long as your subscription remains active. I would recommend against cancelling your membership unless you are sure – I made this mistake last year and it took me a couple of months to get it back again! The February theme was ‘A Power Within’. Please read on to find out what I thought of this one, but do be warned that this post does contain photos and lots of spoilers if you are still waiting for your box to arrive…

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Goosebumps 59-62

Please note that this review may contain spoilers for earlier instalments of this series. You can read my reviews of these novels here:

1-5 | 6-10 | 11-15 | 16-20 | 21-25 | 26-30 | 31-35 | 36-40 | 41-45 | 46-50 | 51-54 | 55-58

It’s finally time for the very last part of my retrospective look at R.L. Stine’s Goosebumps series. Wow. What a long and crazy trip this has been! In case you’ve missed all my previous posts, Goosebumps is a middle grade horror series that originally ran for sixty-two books, which were published between 1992 and 1997. The series was massively popular and has since spawned a handful of spin-offs, movies, video games and a television show. As always, this post will contain massive spoilers for the books in question. You have been warned.

In The Haunted School, Tommy has just moved to a new school and is eager to fit in. However, there is something strange going on. The building is like a maze, strange whispers fill the halls and there is even a creepy room that has been left as a memorial to a class that vanished years before. On the night of the school dance, Tommy finds himself trapped in a parallel version of the school where everything seems to be black & white. As his colour starts to fade, he realises that he needs to find a way out before he is trapped forever.

In Werewolf Skin, Alex’s grandparents warn him not to head into the forest at night, but it seems like a perfect time to take photographs. However, the forest is more dangerous than Alex could ever have imagined. Their neighbours are reclusive and seem to hate children. Alex is told that they keep big, vicious dogs but he is beginning to believe that this is a lie. Could it be that the Marlings are actually werewolves?

In I Live in Your Basement!, Marco’s mother always warned him that softball was dangerous but he never believed her until he took a nasty blow to the head. When he woke up, strange things started to happen. There is now a strange boy named Keith living in his basement – a boy who says that it’s Marco’s job to look after him. Marco knows that Keith is evil but no one will even believe that he exists. How can he prove it to them before it is too late?

In Monster Blood IV, Evan is keen to forget all about his previous terrible experiences with Monster Blood. However, he finds himself reliving the horror again when Andy manages to find a fresh can. The Monster Blood this time is blue and seems to take the form of a slimy monster. While it seems benign at first, it’s not long before the creature begins to multiply and grows vicious. Will Evan be able to discover its weakness before the monsters overrun his town?

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Goosebumps 55-58

Please note that this review may contain spoilers for earlier instalments of this series. You can read my reviews of these novels here:

1-5 | 6-10 | 11-15 | 16-20 | 21-25 | 26-30 | 31-35 | 36-40 | 41-45 | 46-50 | 51-54

We’re starting to get close to the end of this series now, so let’s take another look back at the original Goosebumps books. These sixty-two novels were all written by R.L. Stine and published between 1992 and 1997. The series is still massively popular today and has spawned a number of spin-offs, movies, video games and even a television show. For the purpose of today’s review, I will be looking at books 55 to 58 only. Oh, and as this is more of a retrospective, there will be massive spoilers. You have been warned.

In The Blob That Ate Everyone, Zackie loves to write horror stories despite being terrified of everything. Due to this, he is thrilled when the owner of a strange, burned out antiques store gives him an old typewriter. In fact, she seems desperate to get rid of it. Trouble is, it’s not long before Zackie realises that everything he writes seems to be coming true. What can he do when he inadvertently releases a giant pink monster on the town?

In The Curse of Camp Cold Lake, Sarah is not having a good time at camp. She hates water, the rules seem far too restrictive, and her roommates are all horrible. To get back at them, Sarah decides to fake her own death. That will make everyone sorry. The problem is that something goes horribly wrong and Sarah finds herself haunted by a ghostly girl. One who is determined to be her buddy. Forever.

In My Best Friend is Invisible, Sammy loves science-fiction but is less than impressed when a mysterious invisible boy invades his room. Brent eats his food, messes things up and claims he only wants to be Sammy’s friend. Trouble is, Brent seems to excel in getting Sammy in trouble and now his parents think that he’s losing his mind. But how can Sammy manage to get rid of something that he can’t even see?

In Deep Trouble II, Billy and Sheena are once again spending their summer at their uncle’s floating lab in the Caribbean. Once again, something weird is happening on the reef. Giant fish and jellyfish are appearing, and even Billy’s goldfish have been affected! They soon learn that it’s all due to the horrible experiments of another scientist. However, now that they have learned his secrets, he can’t possibly allow the kids to leave the reef alive…

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Fighting off the Winter Blues

Hi Everyone!

I’ve finally finished my winter reads and I hope that you enjoyed them all! Unfortunately, it’s still cold and dreary outside and spring feels a long way away. It’s time to return to business as usual here on Arkham Reviews to help fight off those winter blues. I have a great selection of novels both new and old to share with you over the coming weeks.

At the moment, I’m reading Scott Cawthon’s latest collection of Five Nights at Freddy’s short stories – Into The Pit. After that, here is a sneak peak of what you can expect as we head into spring. I’m trying to alternate a bit more between new releases and things that have been sitting on my to read pile for a while, so hopefully you will find this selection to be nicely varied:

Dreamland by Robert L Anderson

The Guinevere Deception by Kiersten White

The Stone of Kuromori by Jason Rohan

Scavenge the Stars by Tara Sim

Cinder by Marissa Meyer

The Night Country by Melissa Albert

Aiden’s Quest for Apollo by Tanvi Kesari Pasumarthy

The Toll by Neal Shusterman

Final 7 by Kerry Drewery

Shadowsea by Peter Bunzl

The Smoke Thieves by Sally Green

Crownbreaker by Sebastien de Castell

Naturally, I will also be finishing off my series of retrospective Goosebumps reviews over this time as well. I hope you’re as excited about this little selection as I am!

TTFN!

Owlcrate Unboxing – January 2020

Hi Everyone! You might have noticed that I’ve gotten a bit hooked on Owlcrate over the last few months and so I thought that I would start to share my unboxings with you.

In case you haven’t see the adverts for this online, Owlcrate is a monthly subscription box for fans of Young Adult books. These boxes aren’t the cheapest to buy in the UK (with postage, it costs about $50.00 / £38.00), but I have been absolutely blown away by the quality of the collectables that they contain. Each box is guaranteed to include at least one new release, which is always a hard-backed book and is usually signed by the author and with an exclusive cover. It also contains 3-5 other items, all tied to a monthly theme.

Owlcrates tend to sell out very quickly, thought if you continue paying your monthly subscription they do guarantee that you will receive each box. The January theme was ‘Vengeance Will Be Mine’. Please read on to find out what I thought about the items that it contained, though be warned that this post does contain pictures and lots of spoilers if you’re still waiting for your box to arrive…

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Goosebumps 51-54

Please note that this review may contain spoilers for earlier instalments of this series. You can read my reviews of these novels here:

1-5 | 6-10 | 11-15 | 16-20 | 21-25 | 26-30 | 31-35 | 36-40 | 41-45 | 46-50

Hello everyone! I think it’s time for another trip down memory lane as I take another look back at one of my childhood favourites. In case you’re unfamiliar with R.L. Stine’s most popular work, Goosebumps is a horror anthology series which is aimed at middle grade readers. Although there have been a number of recent spin-offs, movies and video games, the original series ran for sixty-two novels. For the purpose of today’s review, I’m going to be looking at books fifty-one to fifty-four. Oh, and there will be massive spoilers. You have been warned.

In Beware, the Snowman, Jaclyn is annoyed that her Aunt has moved to Sherpia. The tiny village is in the middle of nowhere! Yet it’s not long before she learns that the frozen village has some terrifying local customs. Every house has a scar-faced snowman in its front yard, and the local kids warn her that something terrifying lurks on top of a nearby mountain. Jaclyn is determined to discover if the legends are true, but in doing so learns secrets about her family that she never could have imagined…

In How I Learned to Fly, Jack is rapidly growing to detest Wilson. No matter what he does, Wilson is always determined to prove that he can do better and it is driving him insane! However, when Jack discovers a strange book that claims to contain the secrets of human flight, he realises he has a chance to finally do something better than his rival. After all, there is no way that Wilson can possibly be able to fly, is there?

In Chicken, Chicken, Crystal has always been sceptical of the rumours about Vanessa. Just because someone wears all black, it does not mean that they are a witch. Unfortunately, when Crystal and her brother, Cole, accidentally spill Vanessa’s shopping, they discover that Vanessa just might be magical after all. After all, Crystal and Cole are now changing. If they can’t find a way to stop it, it’s not going to be long before they stop being human altogether…

In Don’t Go To Sleep!, Matt can’t understand why he is forced to sleep in a tiny room when a much larger guest room is going spare. To prove a point, he sneaks into the guest room once night and sleeps in there. Unfortunately, when Matt wakes up, he finds that everything has changed. His two siblings are now little kids and he has suddenly become a teenager! As each day becomes stranger than the one before, Matt starts to regret ever complaining about his old life. Will he ever find a way back to his reality?

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